Reduce Your 30 Year Mortgage To 10 Years Using Mortgage Cycling

 by: Ted Kushner

With all the talk lately about Mortgage Cycling versus Bi-Weekly Mortgages which one is really right for you? Choosing the correct one could literally save you thousands of dollars and shave off approximately 20 years on the life of your 30 year mortgage.

So a little background on the principal of each program needs to be told. Bi-weekly mortgages became popular a few years back when interest rates were extremely high and it made a lot of sense to pay as much on the principal of your mortgage as you can in a systematic way.

The way it works is that your mortgage payments are split in two every month so you end up paying (26) 1/2 payments instead of 12 whole payments which in effect ends up paying one additional month towards your principal.

Doing this ends up saving the average homeowner thousands of dollars on the interest payments over 30 years and shaves off around 7 years of payments. Not bad for back then. But as interest rates started to drop the net effect of savings are not as great now as they were when rates were higher.

But with the discovery of a recent mortgage loophole by Craig Romero, a senior mortgage analyst, Mortgage Cycling was born. Mortgage cycling allows a homeowner to build up 10 times faster then biweekly mortgages and allows you to pay of your 30 year mortgage in 10 years or less.

Mortgage cycling allows a homeowner to build up equity in their home fast using a patent pending technique. So fast that it ends up paying off a traditional 30 year mortgage in just about 10 years.

At first I was skeptical on how powerful mortgage cycling is until I compared using a typical $150,000 loan for thirty years at 7% interest. After running the figures though the difference between a bi-weekly mortgage versus mortgage cycling is dramatic.

       Bi-weekly   Mortgage Cycling 
Equity 1 year  $1,520   $14,061
Equity 3 years  $4,900   $44,972
Equity 5 years  $8,787   $74,179
Equity 9 years  $18,397   $136,429

No matter the loan amount, interest rates or mortgage term, mortgage cycling showed to dramatically cut down the payment time and interest payments to your mortgage company over the life of the loan.

Imagine what you could do with all that extra money that you can put back in your pocket instead of your mortgage company.

Now mortgage cycling may not be for everyone. But for someone who has the discipline it can be a very effective way of building up the equity in your home and to pay it off extremely fast versus using a standard bi-weekly option.

About The Author

Ted Kushner writes about consumer issue topics of interests. If you would like to learn more about Mortgage Cycling and how it can benefit you visit: http://www.affiliaterevenuesources.com/mortgage-cycling .

© 2004 Affiliaterevenuesources.com


Mortgage Cycling - Brilliant or Risky

By George Burk

With mortgage rates near 20-year lows, competition in the mortgage industry is fierce. It seems like every day a new mortgage loan strategy comes out that is suppose to be the best thing since sliced bread. Whether it's a mortgage with no closing costs or an interest only mortgage, everyone is claiming they can save you a ton of money. Now someone has come out with something called Mortgage Cycling. Mortgage Cycling could save you thousands of dollars or it could cost you your home.

Mortgage cycling is a program that advertises itself as a method to payoff your mortgage in 10 years or less without making biweekly mortgage payments or changing your current mortgage. Does mortgage cycling work as advertised? The answer is unequivocally yes √ with a few caveats. I'm going to let you in on the secret to mortgage cycling.

Mortgage cycling is based on making huge lump sum principal payments every 6-10 months. What this means is mortgage cycling works well for those who have at least a few hundred dollars in extra cash at the end of each month. The problem is most people don't have that kind of cash available.

Mortgage Cycling relies on using a revolving Home Equity Line of Credit to make huge lump sum payments against their original mortgage principal balance. When you take out a home equity line of credit, you pay for many of the same expenses as when you financed your original mortgage such as an application fee, title search, appraisal, attorney fees, and points. You also may find most loans have large one-time upfront fees, others have closing costs, and some have continuing costs, such as annual fees. You could find yourself paying hundreds of dollars to establish a home equity line of credit. Most home equity lines of credit also carry what is known as interest rate risk.

Home equity line of credit interest rates are typically variable. The Federal Reserve is currently in the process of raising the overnight federal funds rate. As the Fed continues to raise rates, it is all but inevitable that variable interest rates for mortgages will also rise. Your savings may not be as great as anticipated.

While Mortgage Cycling does have some additional costs for most people, that is not what makes this mortgage reduction strategy risky. If you use a Home Equity Line of Credit and money gets tight, you could lose your home and the equity you have built up. Home equity lines of credit require you to use your home as collateral for the loan. This may put your home at risk if you are late or cannot make your monthly payments. And if you sell your home, most lines of credit require you to pay off your credit line at that time.

Mortgage Cycling requires you to make mortgage payments and Home Equity Line of Credit payments for up to 10 years. For most people mortgage cycling is an extremely risky way to payoff a mortgage. Mortgage cycling should be used only after a careful assessment of the risks and benefits. Prepaying your mortgage is smart. You should explore all of the mortgage reduction alternatives before choosing Mortgage Cycling as a mortgage reduction strategy.

George Burks of http://www.mybiweeklymortgagepayment.com has offered a biweekly mortgage payment plan with no enrollment fee since 1999. His interest in financial topic is varied. Visit http://www.mybiweeklymortgagepayment.com financial library for more information about a revolving Home Equity Line of Credit.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/





 

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